ABOVE & BEYOND


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All posts by Melanie Richter

EVERY CHILD MATTERS: Reconciliation through Education

On Wednesday, September 30th WIC staff and students wore orange shirts to raise awareness and support for what Indigenous children experienced in residential schools.

At West Island College, all Secondary 4 students read The Marrow Thieves by Métis Canadian writer Cherie Dimaline, in their ELA class. They learn about Indigenous issues in Canada and discuss the aftermath of residential schools through the reading of this young adult novel. In Secondary 4 History, all students will be learning about the Catholic and Protestant missions to evangelize, or convert, Indigenous people to Christianity all across Canada and in Inuit communities in the Far North. They will learn about residential schools and the government’s aim to assimilate Indigenous youth. Students at these schools were separated from their siblings, their hair was cut, their clothing was taken away and they were given European names or identification numbers. The school day was divided between education and work; the morning was devoted to learning school material, including religion, and the afternoon was focused on manual labour. Indigenous students were forced to remain at the schools and work during the summer.

What were the Residential Schools?

  • The first residential school, Mohawk Institute, opened in 1831.
  • The last schools closed in 1996. For over 165 years, Indigenous children were forcibly separated from their parents, cultures, traditions, and communities and required to attend residential schools.
  • Indigenous parents did not have a choice – if they did not send their children to residential schools, they risked being arrested, and the children would be taken to school.
  • Seven generations of Indigenous children were removed from families and lost their cultures, land, languages, and identities.
  • All forms of abuse occurred in the schools.
  • The Truth and Reconciliation Commission identified 3,200 deaths in the residential school system.
  • The harmful effects of residential schools can still be felt in families and communities today.

Orange Shirt Day comes from the lived experience of Phyllis (Jack) Webstad and her courage to share her story. In 1973, when she was just six years old, Phyllis was sent to St. Joseph’s Mission Residential School in Williams Lake, B.C. Phyllis picked out a shiny orange shirt to wear to her first day of school. When she arrived at the mission, they took away all her clothes, including the orange shirt! She never saw it again. The colour orange has always reminded her of how her feelings didn’t matter; that no one cared; and how she felt like she was worth nothing at the residential school. When Phyllis was almost fourteen and in grade 8, her son Jeremy was born. Since both her grandmother and mother attended residential schools, she never learned from them “what a parent was supposed to be like.”

Phyllis was inspired by her experiences to launch Orange Shirt Day in 2013 as a day to reflect on and learn about residential schools, and to remember that every child matters. Every child who ever attended residential school mattered – as well as the children who never made it home.

They mattered.

Risks of social media and helpful tips

September 2020

We want to take this opportunity to remind all families within our community of WIC’s continued pursuit to help our students develop into well rounded and global citizens.  In light of the new normal we find ourselves with online learning at the forefront of many academic institutions, and the popularity of social media platforms for students and adults alike, we recognize now more than ever that teachable moments are upon us within the WIC community. 

 

While use of technology can be quite attractive and effective as a way to communicate an idea, it also has the potential to carry with it miscommunication and harm.  Tone of voice can be lost in a text, words misinterpreted, or perceptions unintended.  We remind you of our digital media pledge, where we highlight the proper use of our devices, and the respect we must maintain for others, just as we would if speaking face to face.  

 

We are aware of a recent event taking place on multiple social media platforms such as Facebook and Tik Tok, where someone posted their video, leaving many viewers traumatized, shocked, and upset.  Let this be an example we can use to teach our students, and you as parents with your children at home, about the risks that can come from social media. 

 

We encourage you to speak to your children about the proper use of social media and texting.  If interested, please visit this website for more information on safe use of the multitude of online media platforms. 

Mrs. Morse
Guidance Counsellor

A Safe and Fun Night Out for Two Great Causes

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On Friday, July 10th, the WIC Foundation hosted an event that brought the WIC community together in person. While respecting physical distancing guidelines, we came together as a community in a way that was unique and heartwarming. We celebrated the beginning of summer vacation under the stars with the very popular Montreal band Freddie James Project at the Royalmount drive-in theatre. 

The event was also a fundraiser and thanks to many very generous donors we raised over $10,000 in support of the WIC inspire campaign and West Island Community Shares.  Being a part of the WIC family means we are part of a community.  And West Island Community Shares (WICS) is certainly an organization focused on improving the lives of those individuals and families in our community who desperately need it.  20% of the proceeds raised that evening will be distributed to WICS.  

We wish to highlight the generosity of our corporate sponsors and partners, without whom this evening would not have been possible.

Wishing you all a wonderful and restful summer.

Joel Erickson,
President, WIC Foundation

 

WIC’s Uniform


At West Island College, we believe that a uniform encourages students to recognize each other for whom they are and not whom they appear to be. The policy also allows the community at large to recognize our students as a group of young people who share a common ideal and goal: “The Pursuit of Excellence”.

All students are expected to arrive and depart from school wearing the school uniform. Students will wear the uniform, at all times, while in school.

Due to the unprecedented nature of COVID-19 and the resulting social distancing guidelines, Top Marks (our uniform supplier) is unable to proceed with our traditional fitting sessions. In addition, their showroom is temporarily closed. In order to better serve you, Top Marks is providing the following, on all orders received no later than June 30, 2020 :
● Free shipping
● Pre-paid return label
● Return shipping bag

Top Marks is asking for your cooperation in submitting orders by June 30, 2020, in order to guarantee delivery of your order, prior to the start of the school year.

Used Uniform Sale
Given the current situation, WIC will not be able to host a used uniform sale. Instead, we have set up the following Facebook group page for parents to use. The school will not be involved in the sale or purchase of uniforms. Kindly refer to the following terms of service. ALL items sold on this page must be the official Top Marks label and cannot be substituted.

Formal Uniform: Junior School (Secondary 1, 2)
Girls
● Green crested cardigan, with zipper (please note that cardigans with buttons are no longer permitted)
● Grey skort or grey pants – Please note that the skort should be worn at no more than 3 inches above the knee
(purchased from Top Marks)
● White shirt (no button-down collar) long- or short-sleeved shirts
● School tie
● Grey knee socks or tights
● All-black dress shoes, polishable

Boys
● Green crested cardigan, with zipper (please note that cardigans with buttons are no longer permitted)
● Grey pants (purchased from Top Marks)
● White shirt (no button-down collar) long- or short-sleeved shirts
● School tie
● Black socks
● All-black dress shoes, polishable

Senior School (Secondary 3, 4, 5)
The green cardigan is replaced by a black crested blazer for both boys and girls. In addition, the skort is replaced by a tartan kilt, for the girls.

Summer Uniform
The summer uniform is permitted at the beginning and end of the school year. The exact dates will be announced to the
students. The summer uniform is optional.

Summer Uniform Junior School (Secondary 1, 2)
Girls
● White-crested West Island College polo shirt (purchased from Top Marks)
● Grey skort or grey pants – Please note that the skort should be worn no more than 3 inches above the knee (purchased from Top Marks)
● Grey knee socks or tights
● All-black dress shoes, polishable

Boys
● White-crested West Island College polo shirt (purchased from Top Marks)
● Grey pants (purchased from Top Marks)
● Black socks
● All-black dress shoes, polishable

Physical Education Uniform
This uniform is to be worn for all physical education classes, team practices, and intramural competitions.

Boys and Girls
● Black-crested athletic shorts
● Crested grey t-shirt
● White socks
● Proper athletic footwear, of any colour with non-marking soles

The optional, black-crested sweatpants and sweatshirts are recommended for outdoor activities in late fall and early
spring. No other athletic wear is permitted to be worn on campus at any time.

New Creative Writing Award In Memory of Dr. Leslie Cohen

 
On January, 28, 2020, Dr. Leslie Cohen passed after a courageous battle with metastatic breast cancer.
 
Before Dr. Cohen passed away, she and her beloved husband Samuel (Sam) paid a visit to the West Island College Advancement Office to inquire about setting up an award in their name. After many conversations, the two decided to create an endowed award for graduating students that celebrates accomplishments in creative writing.
 
Dr. Cohen taught thousands of students at Concordia University since the 1980s in both Psychology (Arts and Science), and Management (John Molson School of Business). Since 1990, she taught at Marianopolis College in Psychology, Methodology, and Management. 
 
Until the end of her life, she maintained close relationships with some of her former students. She was proud of them and delighted to see their beautiful families and professional successes. Many of her successful students graduated from West Island College. 
 
We are honoured that Leslie and Sam have chosen to create an award for a deserving graduating student each year at West Island College that will be judged by the school’s English Department.

Donations in her memory may be made to the “Leslie Cohen and Samuel Clement Convocation Prize in Creative Writing”.
 
 
To make a donation by cheque, please make payable to WIC Foundation care of the WIC Advancement Office, 851 Tecumseh, DDO, QC H9B 2L2.
 
For all other inquiries, please contact 514-683-4660 or [email protected].
 
 
 

Giving Tuesday 2019

GIVE THE GIFT OF EDUCATION

YOUR HELP WILL MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Thanks to the generosity of the WIC community, over 250 WIC families have received financial aid over the last 45 years.
 
With your support, we can help more families in need.
 
This December 3rd, give a child the WIC experience.
 
Our goal is to raise $35,000 for bursaries & financial aid.
 
EVERY GIFT MATTERS!
 

The WIC & Voyageurs jackets are now available!

Jackets are available for purchase by the entire WIC community. Fully lined with leather sleeves and chenille lettering.
 
*Jackets are not a part of the required uniform.
 
 
You can customize your jacket by adding a name, year, sport or club on the sleeve. 
 
To get started, select either style A (WIC) or B (Voyageurs), then choose either white or black leather sleeves.
 
Minimum order of 12 for each sleeve colour option.
 
Kindly print the attached order form and return to WIC along with a cheque payable to Campea.
 
Please allow a minimum of 7 weeks for delivery.
 
For more information, or to try on a sample size, please contact us by clicking here.

The WIC & Voyageurs jackets are now available!

Jackets are available for purchase by the entire WIC community. Fully lined with leather sleeves and chenille lettering.
 
*Jackets are not a part of the required uniform.
 
 
You can customize your jacket by adding a name, year, sport or club on the sleeve. 
 
To get started, select either style A (WIC) or B (Voyageurs), then choose either white or black leather sleeves.
 
Minimum order of 12 for each sleeve colour option.
 
Kindly print the attached order form and return to WIC along with a cheque payable to Campea.
 
Please allow a minimum of 7 weeks for delivery.
 
For more information, or to try on a sample size, please contact us by clicking here.

Student Success

WIC students will begin to have access to a myBlueprint​ account this academic year. Using the online educational planning tool, students will begin the process of exploring education and career choices. This will remain accessible to all students even once they graduate from WIC. 

Through myBlueprint, students will consider the following 4 questions:  

  1. Who am I?  
  2. Who do I want to become?  
  3. What are my opportunities?  
  4. What are my plans to achieve my goals?  

Students will be able to import all of their relevant work while at WIC with the goal of building a portfolio that can be shared as a CV if they so choose. 

The first cohort to use this online tool will be secondary 1 and 2 students since this is a new government requirement called Academic and Career Guidance Content (you can read more about ACGC here)

“myBlueprint is being integrated into the curriculum so that teachers can guide students through the process of self-discovery at an appropriate pace and at the right time.” says Lori Belair, Director of Studies.

The secondary IV students will also have access immediately as it complements the Career course, while secondary V students are also exploring the platform in their ethics class in order to make better decisions when it comes time to CEGEP selection. The timing is ideal for getting ready for post-secondary school applications.

 

 

International Travel

Trips are open to Secondary III, IV & V students only.  Spaces are limited.
Dates for the trip are subject to change based on flight availability.

INFORMATION EVENING & REGISTRATION:
Monday, September 16th, 2019
2019 @ 7:00 pm

INTERNATIONAL TRIPS 2020
SOUTH AFRICA – CULTURE & ADVENTURE (February 26 – March 8, 2020)

SPAIN – CULTURAL & HISTORICAL (April 11 – April 21, 2020)

Composting at WIC


The Warriors Verts are proud to announce that the school will be composting!

Our school will be using compostable biodegradable plates and bowls this year. When students finish eating, they can throw away their plates with the remaining food for composting.

There will be posters indicating what can be recycled, composted or disposed of in garbage.

Thank you for helping making our world a little greener!

Les exécutifs des Warriors Verts,
Thalia Urbani, Felicity Murcada, Raphaël Ghali et Bruno Chieco

ECA Fair 2019

This Wednesday during the junior lunch period, secondary I and II students were invited to visit the school gym where the extracurricular activity fair was taking place. We encourage and celebrate student involvement at every level. Offered before school, during lunch time or after school throughout the week and occasionally on weekends, extracurricular activities (E.C.A.’s) complement the school’s pedagogy in helping each child realize his/her potential.

With over 40 activities, clubs, and committees available to the student body, this means that students at WIC are able to participate in several activities throughout the year. E.C.A.’s provide students with an excellent opportunity and outlet to pursue special interests, develop new talents, and foster leadership potential.

The school’s list of E.C.A.’s reflects the interest of the students in a variety of domains including athletics, the sciences and the arts.

Athletics : Clubs & Comités:
Golf (all levels; term 1) House Council (level 1-5; term 1-4)
XC running (all levels; term1) Leadership Club (level 1-5; term 1-4)
Soccer (BG, BB, Sr. girls, Sr. Boys; term 1) Debating (level 1-5; terms 1-4)
Volleyball (BG, BB, JG, Sr. girls, Sr. boys; term 1) Grad Committee (level 5; terms 1-4)
Touch football (JB; term 1) Theatre (level 1-5; terms 1-3)
Basketball (BG, MG, BB, MB, Sr. girls, Sr. boys; terms 2&3) Yearbook (level 1-5; terms 1-4)
Hockey (Jr/Sr terms 2&3) De Week en WIC (level 1-5; terms 1-4)
Badminton (all levels; terms 3) Warriors verts (level 1-5; terms 1-4)
Halo Run (all levels; term 4) Band (level 1-5; terms 1-4)
Flag football (BG, Sr. girls; term 4) Interact (level 1-5; terms 1-4)
Rugby (BB, MB; Sr. boys term 4) Art Club (level 1-5; terms 1-4)
Track & Field (all levels; term 4) Variety Show (level 1-5; terms 1-2)
Tennis (all levels; term 4) Ski Club (level 1-5; terms 3)
House league (all levels; term 1-4) Cooking Club (level 3-5; TBC)
WICAA (all levels; term 1-4) Photography (level 1-5; terms 1-4)
Swimming (all levels; term 3) Improv (level 1-3; terms 1-4)
  Ping Pong (level 1-5; terms 2 & 3)
  WIAIH (level 1-5; terms 4)
  Book Club (level 1-5; terms 1-4)
  Robotics (level 1-5; terms 1-3)
  Board Games Club (TBC)
  Game Club (level 1-5; TBC)
  Dance (level 1-5; terms 1-4)
  Running Club (level 1-5; terms 4)
  Vocal Assemble (level 1-5; terms 1-2)
   

View the ECA Calendar here

Orientation Day 2019


Orientation Day on Monday, August 26th was an exciting day for all of us!

Our Student Leaders lined up outside the front entrance to greet the class of 2024. Fears of transitioning to high school were alleviated by pairing the new students with student leaders who took small groups on school tours to
familiarize them to their new home for the next five years. After a short assembly led by our Headmaster Mr. LaFrance and Mme Simard, the students were introduced to their teachers.

Students were then divided into groups for ice-breaker activities and games. Combination locks and lockers were assigned before recess but not before they mastered opening the locks.

Mr. Marsolais gave a quick class on how to organize your locker. Students were introduced to the cafeteria staff and how the lunch period, recess and lunch cards work. Our cafeteria is excellent! There are always a lot of healthy and tasty selections. The menu is posted weekly in the Au Courant online under the Cafeteria link.

After the lunch break, the students were broken into their houses (Davies, Grant and Martin) and they learnt about the upcoming ECA (Extra-curricular activities) fair, school rules, and the outdoor education trip that will take place up north September 10th and 11th.

The day concluded with a group photograph in the courtyard. Students left for home much more familiar with their new school and anticipating Tuesday’s classes, a lot more students in the halls and a special BBQ lunch.

Have a great year!

WIC Fest ’19

The WIC Foundation is once again inviting all members of the WIC family (students staff and their respective families) to come and celebrate the new academic year with a fun afternoon of games, inflatables, music, food trucks and so much more! 

Wednesday, September 18th, from 3 – 6 pm

This is a FREE DRESS day for students.

and all the proceeds from this fun event go right back into WIC by supporting our school’s greatest needs

 We look forward to seeing you on September 18!

WIC Fest ’19

 

La Fondation du Collège invite encore une fois tous les membres de la famille du Collège – les élèves, les parents, les grands-parents, les anciens élèves, les enseignants, les membres du personnel – à célébrer en après-midi le début de la nouvelle année scolaire avec des jeux amusants, des camions-restaurants et bien plus encore!

Mercredi 18 septembre de 15 h à 18 h

Toutes les recettes de cet événement seront remises directement à l’école pour répondre aux besoins les plus pressants.

 

Nous avons hâte de vous rencontrer le 18 septembre!

Bonne rentrée scolaire!